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Critical Essay – Learning process

The assessment process in the learning process tends to be significant when it comes to the facets of grading students, curriculum advancement, placement, funding and instructional needs. It determines whether the objectives of a lesson have been achieved. Both the instructor and the students should be aware of the objectives such that it becomes clear on what is expected from each party. Assessment process makes it possible for students to choose aspects indicating their knowledge of taught content in addition to developing the comprehension of students in relation to the learning outcomes (Orlich et.al, 2013).

When students judge their work, it becomes easier to sharpen their skills such that they align with the expected objectives. Also, assessments make it possible for the teachers and learners to share their expectations from the learning process, makes students gain confidence when teachers assess their skills in addition to the students gaining more transparency in their work. Science, like any other subject, tends to be involving and requires a lot of attention for both the teacher and the learners to benefit from the system (Orlich et.al, 2013). Two examples of effective assessment strategies in teaching the science subject in a class of young learners are group discussion observations and graphic presentation of content. 

From a more general perspective, the most common forms of assessment used in the learning process include formative and summative assessments (Burden & Byrd, 2015). Formative evaluations take place during the lesson while summative evaluation takes place at the end of a lesson; with the aim of testing the understanding of the learners. Group discussion observations and graphic presentations both can be perceived as formative forms of assessments as they mostly occur during a lesson with the focus being on the goals and objectives of a lesson. Observation by the teachers as a form of assessment has been long used as a significant basis of information when it comes to the collection of data and presenting reports on learner’s demonstrations in regards to the objectives of a lesson. The assessment is mostly effective when the learners are between one and ten years old as the level of teacher monitoring decreases as one advances. Formal assessment replaces observation with advancement in education. A systematic gathering of evidence is required for an observation assessment to be effective. Furthermore, there is the need for foresight and having a list of the anticipated outcomes in regards to the recording of evidence (Burden & Byrd, 2015).

The science subject involves plenty of practical work and applications of the content in real life situation and hence an interactive subject. One of the benefits of using observation in a science lesson is that it becomes easier to prompt the learning outcomes not displayed by the learners (Morrison et.al, 2010). Furthermore, the evaluation might be made comprehensive such that all the details are repeated to the learners till they full grasp of content. The science subjects require plenty of focus especially when students are handling practical areas. The observation assessment allows plenty of focus from the instructor such that keen attention is paid to ensure that the students carry out the experiments or practical work as expected (Morrison et.al, 2010).

Observation allows manipulation of influences such that an instructor is presented with various areas to carry out the assessment. It becomes easier for the instructor to frequently check the performance of the learners and hence an effective approach when used in teaching science. The observation technique allows standardization as it supports the aspects evidence-based analysis. Students gain a holistic comprehension of content such that they make interpretations when new content is presented (Morrison et.al, 2010).

Graphical presentation of content puts into perspective the aspects of creativity and the ability of learners to recall what they have learned in class such that they present it graphically (Meltzer, 2011). For example, in the science subject, learners may be assessed by instructing them to draw a well-labeled diagram of a plant to assess whether they have understood the different parts of a plant. The instructors focus on the organization of the graphical presentation in addition to using the presentation to test the confidence of the learners. The presentation may be done in groups or individually such that the instructor assesses the progress of the learners as they do their work and even offer more guidelines on areas that they might be finding challenging (Meltzer, 2011).

The instructor may also be involved in the graphical presentation especially in a class that contains some learners with learning disabilities. The involvement may be through scaffolding where the instructor makes the graphical presentation together with the class, goes through the presentation with the class and then gives each child the opportunity to make his or her graphical presentations. With such involvement, learners can recall what they have been taught in addition to relating the work to previously learned content (Meltzer, 2011).

As stated earlier, two examples of effective assessment strategies in teaching the science subject in a class of young learners are group discussion observations and graphic presentation of content. Group discussion observations and graphic presentations both can be perceived as formative forms of assessments as they mostly occur during a lesson with the focus being on the goals and objectives of a lesson. The science subject involves plenty of practical work and applications of the content in real life situation and hence the need for approaches such as Group discussion observations and graphic presentations that allow efficient interaction.

References

Burden, P. R., & Byrd, D. M. (2015). Methods for effective teaching: Meeting the needs of all students. New York: Pearson.

Meltzer, L. (Ed.). (2011). Executive function in education: From theory to practice. Boston: Guilford Press.

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kemp, J. E., & Kalman, H. (2010). Designing effective instruction. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Orlich, D. C., Harder, R. J., Callahan, R. C., Trevisan, M. S., & Brown, A. H. (2012). Teaching strategies: A guide to effective instruction. New York: Cengage Learning

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